Monday, March 28, 2005

Big media, poor copyediting
The first sentence in a CNN: Money article reads: "Burger King is reportedly set to unveil a large new breakfast sandwich that bets not everyone is looking to watch their diet."

Anyone else notice the serious grammatical error in that sentence? If it were correct, it would say "not everyone is looking to watch his diet." You'd think such a large media outlet would have people to check for such things. Heck, spell checker in Microsoft Word picks up on that mistake.

3 comments:

GaijinBiker said...

Better to recast the sentence:

"Burger King is reportedly set to unveil a large new breakfast sandwich that bets not everyone is diet-conscious."

Also, I saw a story today about the new earthquake near Indonesia (already superseded on Yahoo! News by a new version) that said something like:

"Afraid of another disaster, sirens blared as residents rushed to higher ground."

Must be those new artificial-intelligence sirens I've been hearing so much about.

GaijinBiker said...

Actually, now that I think about it, my version suggests that the sandwich is the one doing the betting. Bad grammar, unless you consider it to be an acceptable figure of speech.

To be completely precise, one would have to say something like:

"Burger King, betting that not everyone is diet-conscious, is reportedly set to unveil a large new breakfast sandwich."

My personal opinion, though, is that the former version flows better and is an acceptable colloquialism.

waterboy said...

That's some "non-gender specific" language for you. Some (liberals, no doubt) are trying to make the plural "their" refer to a singular pronoun like "everybody." Why? It's sexist, you chauvinist pig! ;-)

In a paper here at college, I must use the wordy "he or she" when I want to use a pronoun to refer back to something. This is a concise, grammatically correct construction, yet I am not allowed to use it. Academia. Go figure.